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    Volpino Italiano

    Recommended harness size
    Dog walking harness size: Baby 2 & Mini-mini

    Heigth: 25-30 cm

    Weight: 4.1-5.4 kg

    Lifespan: 14-16 years

    SKU: volpino-italiano

    Dog walking harness for Volpino Italiano

    Julius-K9 harness volpino italiano

    Source: http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/volpino-italiano

    Dog information

    • Spitz-type dog
    • dark eyes
    • used as a watchdog on Tuscan Farms

    Dog characteristics

    • playful
    • affectionate
    • lively
    • watchful

    Volpino Italiano dog names

    • Adolfo
    • Amalia
    • Lucky
    • Luigi
    • Yancy

    Overview - Volpino Italiano

    The Volpino Italiano is Italy’s contribution to the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. Although he’s rarely seen in the United States, if you do spot one, he will most likely be adorned in white fur (which sets off his dark eyes). His coat may also come in fawn, red, black or champagne, but those colors are uncommon.

    Generally alert and intelligent, the Volpino tends to be a good watchdog, barking to alert you of the presence of people on your property. He can be wary of strangers, sharply registering his alarm when he encounters new people or dogs on walks. Even so, this snowball of cuteness will draw the admiration of people wanting to get to know him.

    If you are looking for a small but generally active dog that can potentially excel at dog sports such as agility, nose work and rally, this typical ball of energy is one to consider.

    With early socialization, he can be easygoing enough to live in a family with older children (because of his small size, he could be easily dropped and injured by small children). Volpinos can get along well with other pets, including cats, especially if they are raised with them.

    The Volpino’s double coat should be brushed at least weekly, and yes, it sheds.

    History of Volpino Italiano

    he Volpino is an Italian Spitz breed and was once popular with nobles and farmers alike for his small size and alert personality. Court ladies loved him as a lap dog, and working folk appreciated his watchdog abilities — not to mention the fact that he didn’t eat as much as a big dog. Even the artist Michelangelo is said to have kept one of the little dogs.

    Italian immigrants brought the little dogs with them to North America. At the time, however — the late 19th and early 20th century — the dogs remained family pets and were never recognized here as a distinct breed.

    The ENCI (Italian Kennel Club) wrote the first standard for the breed in 1903. The Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the Volpino in 1956, but by that time the breed’s numbers were dwindling in their homeland of Italy. By 1965 only a few remained, mostly in the hands of farmers. In 1984, the Italian Kennel Club made a successful effort, led by Enrico Franceschetti, to revive the breed, although it still remains few in number.

    North American breeders are now working to establish the breed in the United States and Canada. The United Kennel Club recognized the Volpino in 2006. The Volpino does not yet have the numbers to achieve full recognition from the American Kennel Club.

    For more information please visit http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/volpino-italiano

    Related dog breeds: Yorkshire TerrierChinese CrestedChizerChorkieMaltese, PapillonMiniature Pinscher, Japanese ChinJapanese Terrier, Volpino ItalianoBrussels Griffon.

     

    Products specifications
    Dog Harness Size Baby 2
    Dog Harness Size Mini-mini
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    Dog walking harness for Volpino Italiano

    Julius-K9 harness volpino italiano

    Source: http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/volpino-italiano

    Dog information

    • Spitz-type dog
    • dark eyes
    • used as a watchdog on Tuscan Farms

    Dog characteristics

    • playful
    • affectionate
    • lively
    • watchful

    Volpino Italiano dog names

    • Adolfo
    • Amalia
    • Lucky
    • Luigi
    • Yancy

    Overview - Volpino Italiano

    The Volpino Italiano is Italy’s contribution to the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. Although he’s rarely seen in the United States, if you do spot one, he will most likely be adorned in white fur (which sets off his dark eyes). His coat may also come in fawn, red, black or champagne, but those colors are uncommon.

    Generally alert and intelligent, the Volpino tends to be a good watchdog, barking to alert you of the presence of people on your property. He can be wary of strangers, sharply registering his alarm when he encounters new people or dogs on walks. Even so, this snowball of cuteness will draw the admiration of people wanting to get to know him.

    If you are looking for a small but generally active dog that can potentially excel at dog sports such as agility, nose work and rally, this typical ball of energy is one to consider.

    With early socialization, he can be easygoing enough to live in a family with older children (because of his small size, he could be easily dropped and injured by small children). Volpinos can get along well with other pets, including cats, especially if they are raised with them.

    The Volpino’s double coat should be brushed at least weekly, and yes, it sheds.

    History of Volpino Italiano

    he Volpino is an Italian Spitz breed and was once popular with nobles and farmers alike for his small size and alert personality. Court ladies loved him as a lap dog, and working folk appreciated his watchdog abilities — not to mention the fact that he didn’t eat as much as a big dog. Even the artist Michelangelo is said to have kept one of the little dogs.

    Italian immigrants brought the little dogs with them to North America. At the time, however — the late 19th and early 20th century — the dogs remained family pets and were never recognized here as a distinct breed.

    The ENCI (Italian Kennel Club) wrote the first standard for the breed in 1903. The Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the Volpino in 1956, but by that time the breed’s numbers were dwindling in their homeland of Italy. By 1965 only a few remained, mostly in the hands of farmers. In 1984, the Italian Kennel Club made a successful effort, led by Enrico Franceschetti, to revive the breed, although it still remains few in number.

    North American breeders are now working to establish the breed in the United States and Canada. The United Kennel Club recognized the Volpino in 2006. The Volpino does not yet have the numbers to achieve full recognition from the American Kennel Club.

    For more information please visit http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/volpino-italiano

    Related dog breeds: Yorkshire TerrierChinese CrestedChizerChorkieMaltese, PapillonMiniature Pinscher, Japanese ChinJapanese Terrier, Volpino ItalianoBrussels Griffon.

     

    Products specifications
    Dog Harness Size Baby 2
    Dog Harness Size Mini-mini